Volunteers Mask the Community

Carol Andrews

Carol Andrews

Karen Carr

Karen Carr

Linda Shannon-Hills

A key transmission route of COVID-19 is via droplets that fly out of our mouths—that includes when we speak, not just when we cough or sneeze. A portion of these droplets quickly evaporate, becoming tiny particles whose inhalation by those nearby is hard to prevent. Until now, most scientific research and discussion about masks has been directed at protecting medical workers from ingress.

Masks can be worn to protect the wearer from getting infected or masks can be worn to protect others from being infected by the wearer. Protecting the wearer is difficult. It requires medical-grade respirator masks, a proper fit, and careful putting on and taking off. But masks also can be worn to prevent transmission to others, and this is their most important use for society.

With this in mind, our officials have made it known that people should wear masks, even homemade cloth masks when out in public. Masks have been difficult to come by, so generous volunteer sewers from SaddleBrooke Ranch and numerous assistants donated their time, material, and caring to help out the SaddleBrooke Ranch community by making homemade cloth face masks. Approximately 525 masks were made and distributed to residents at the Ranch.

The cloth face masks don’t completely guarantee COVID-19 protection. You still need to follow all the precautions. Wash your hands for 20 seconds and don’t touch your nose, mouth, or eyes. Besides making masks for residents, many of the volunteers made masks to take to Banner Health, National Alliance on Mental Health for the homeless in Tucson, women’s shelter, and other medical facilities.

All masks were a donation to others. We only asked that recipients pay it forward—help others out, donate to charities and causes in need of help.

A big thanks goes out to the many people making masks and cutting fabric to help the Ranch community. Carol Andrews, Dian Gowen, Debbie Chapman, Carol Fielding, Janice Hynes, Cher Stroben, Sharon Groth, Diane Still, Vern Nulk, Georgia Gonzales, Ann Burkart, Karen Carr, Alice Ann Lenzini, Betty Seberger, Dale Farland, Sue Hitchey, Tove Page, Nini Frank, Kay Johnson, Paula Johnson, Susan Engebretson, Connie Calderson, Pam Wample, Polly Jones, Kim Schweitzer, Marilyn Graham, Jodie Koerner, Brenda Mills, and Terry Zimmerman. Thanks for all the elastic goes to Cheryl Murray and Mardiece Patrick.

If you need a mask, send a request to [email protected]